Malpractice Cases We Handle

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Birth Asphyxia
Birth Injuries
Cerebral Palsy
Delay in Delivery
Developmental Delay
Delay in Performing Emergency C-Section
Erb’s Palsy/Shoulder Dystocia
Failure to Resuscitate
Fetal Distress
Preeclampsia/Eclampsia
Stillbirths
Newborn Brain Injury
Quadriplegia/Tetraplegia
Spinal Cord/Paralysis
Traumatic Brain Injury
Brain Bleed/Aneurysm
Birth Trauma
Brain Injured Infants
Skull Fracture
Paralysis
Paraplegia
Brain & Nerve Damage
Brain Infection/Meningitis
Increased Intracranial Pressure
Stroke/”Brain Attack”
Surgical and Hospital Mistakes
Anesthesia Mistakes
Doctor/Nurse Miscommunication and Hand-Offs
Emergency Room Errors
Failure to Review Test Results
Failure to Obtain Informed Consent
Lack of Consent/Medical Battery
Medication Mistakes
Never Events
Post Operative Errors
Surgical Mishaps
Diagnosis and Treatment Errors
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm/Thoracic Aneurysm
Cancer Misdiagnosis
Delayed in Diagnosis of Cancer
Heart Attack
Infections
Medication Errors
Pulmonary Embolism and DVT
Misdiagnosed Aneurysm
Wrongful Death
Inappropriate or Negligently Performed Surgery
Amputation
Misdiagnosis of Disease or Injury
Disability
Disfigurement
Emergency Room Malpractice
Delayed Treatment
Anesthetic Mishaps

Birth Asphyxia

“Asphyxia” means lack of oxygen. “Birth asphyxia” is when a baby’s brain and other organs do not get enough oxygen before, during, or right after birth. This can happen without anyone knowing. Without oxygen, cells cannot work properly. Waste products (acids) build up in the cells and cause temporary or permanent damage. Our medical malpractice attorneys at The Kennedy Law Team in Baltimore offer compassion and legal guidance as you search for an explanation to your child’s birth asphyxiation. When medical negligence is the cause, we fight for your child to get all of the care and compensation they deserve for their suffering.
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Birth Injuries

Delivery of a healthy child is dependent on many factors, including timing of a doctor's actions or emergency C-section delivery and his or her skills in using delivery-assistance instruments. An error before, during or immediately after delivery can result in devastating trauma to the infant and / or mother. Injuries to the child can include oxygen depravation that results in death, brain damage, developmental disorders, or cerebral palsy and brachial injuries and shoulder dystocia. Mothers can suffer C-section complications, uterine rupture and death.
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Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a term used to describe a group of chronic conditions affecting body movements and muscle coordination. It is caused by damage to one or more specific areas of the brain, usually occurring before, during or shortly following birth. The injury sometimes is caused by medical mistakes. People with cerebral palsy require extensive medical treatment, therapy and training, sometimes for their entire lives.
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Delay in Delivery

Every woman’s labor is unique, even from one pregnancy to the next. In some cases, labor is over in a matter of hours. In others, labor tests a mother’s physical and emotional stamina. Labor is broken down into three “stages.” In the first stage, the cervix opens (dilates) and thins out (effaces) to allow the baby to move into the birth canal. This is the longest of the three stages of labor. It can last several hours, especially in first- time mothers. It ends when the cervix is dilated to 10 cm and it is time to push. The second stage of labor is the “pushing” stage. It can take from a few minutes to more than an hour or two before the baby is delivered. Finally, in the third stage, steps are taken to deliver the placenta. Ideally, everything goes smoothly in labor and delivery. The mother progresses through the “stages” as described above, and a healthy baby is delivered. Sometimes, however, a problem develops that requires quick action by doctors and nurses. Perhaps the mother isn’t progressing as expected and the baby is beginning to struggle. Some babies are better than others at dealing with the changes in the uterus that occur in labor. Doctors and nurses are trained to identify clues that a baby is having trouble in the uterus. When that occurs, steps must be taken to speed up the delivery, so that the baby can be rescued before it suffers a significant injury.
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Developmental Delay

In general, there are certain milestones children should achieve as they develop. Of course, every child is different and exact ages can vary. But when your child is constantly behind on these achievements, it may be time to consider what may have occurred at the very beginning: the child’s delivery. Your child may already have been diagnosed with a condition such as epilepsy or cerebral palsy. However, you may not have yet found an answer for why your child’s development has been delayed. Our medical malpractice attorneys at The Kennedy Law Team use our scientific educational backgrounds to put together the pieces to identify the negligence that led to your child’s developmental delays. Families deserve compensation for their child’s delays when physicians and other healthcare workers have failed to provide proper care.
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Delay in Performing Emergency C-Section

From time to time, complications arise during labor and delivery that require an immediate, emergency Caesarean section. Among the most frequent of such complications is fetal distress, which occurs when the baby does not get enough oxygen in the uterus. The decision to perform an emergency C-section for fetal distress usually is made by an obstetrician after she has carefully reviewed the electronic fetal monitor strips that record the baby’s heart rate pattern.
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Erb’s Palsy/Shoulder Dystocia

Sometimes during delivery, a baby’s shoulders can get stuck after the head has been delivered. This is called a shoulder “dystocia.” It happens most often when the baby is big compared to the size of the mother’s pelvis. Doctors must be very careful in delivering a baby who is “stuck” at the shoulders. Pulling improperly on the baby’s head can result in a severe injury to nerves in the baby’s neck. The “brachial plexus” is a bundle of nerves in the baby’s neck. These nerves provide feeling and movement to the baby’s arms, hands, and fingers. If these nerves are pulled or stretched too much during a difficult delivery, the baby can lose feeling and use of her arm, hand, and fingers. When a baby loses the use of her arm due to an injury to these nerves, it is called an “Erb’s Palsy.”
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Failure to Resuscitate

When a baby is born, it must transition quickly from life in the uterus to life outside the uterus. The first challenge is for the newborn to breathe independently. Instead of getting oxygen from the placenta, the baby has to draw oxygen in to its newly-expanding lungs. The first breath usually comes within ten seconds of delivery. Sometimes, however, a baby has difficulty taking its first breath. Instead of hearing a lusty cry, those attending the delivery may hear nothing. This can be very worrisome for parents. Health Care Providers must take proper steps, in a timely manner, to help the newborn breathe.
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Fetal Distress

The process of child labor is an involved, often stressful, event which should result in the joyful delivery of a healthy baby. Unfortunately, significant complications can occur during the labor and birthing process. Your medical care providers must be aware of these complications. The attorneys at The Kennedy Law Team are aggressive, compassionate litigators who will get to the bottom of your medical malpractice case involving fetal distress. Fetal distress can cause catastrophic injury or death at a time when your medical providers should be hyper-vigilant regarding potential medical complications. We understand fetal distress cases and the potential merits of a claim in this area of the law. Complications during birth happen, and they must be addressed quickly in order to ensure the health of the mother and the unborn child.
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Preeclampsia/Eclampsia

Preeclampsia is a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and signs of damage to another organ system, often the kidneys. Preeclampsia usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy in a woman whose blood pressure had been normal. Even a slight rise in blood pressure may be a sign of preeclampsia. That is one of the reasons that a woman’s blood pressure is checked at every prenatal visit to her obstetrician’s office. The personal injury attorneys at The Kennedy Law Team review our clients' medical records carefully whenever preeclampsia causes complications during a pregnancy.
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Stillbirths

Losing a child is devastating, especially when a stillbirth occurred due to medical negligence or error. The attorneys at The Kennedy Law Team are knowledgeable, passionate litigators with vast experience handling medical malpractice cases involving stillbirths. We understand the sensitive nature of these situations and the pain you suffer. We tirelessly advocate for you and your family. Most of the time, there is an identifiable reason why an unborn child died.
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Newborn Brain Injury

Brain injuries affect about three in 1,000 babies born at full term in the United States. One half or more of these injuries are associated with oxygen deprivation during labor and delivery (“birth asphyxia”). Newborn brain injury is called “neonatal encephalopathy.” Babies with neonatal encephalopathy often show a decreased level of consciousness or seizures in the first few days of life. They also frequently have breathing difficulties and poor muscle tone and reflexes. Sometimes they have decreased APGAR scores at the time of birth. They often have additional problems with other organs.
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Quadriplegia/Tetraplegia

Quadriplegia (also called Tetraplegia) is paralysis caused by injury that results in partial or total loss of use of all four limbs and the torso. Paraplegia is similar but affects only two limbs (typically both legs). Quadriplegia usually involves loss of both sensory and motor function. The terms “quadriparesis” or “tetraparesis” are used when sensation remains normal but the ability to move is lost. These injuries are almost always caused due to the negligent actions of someone other than the victim.
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Spinal Cord/Paralysis

The spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of the back. It carries messages back and forth between the brain and the rest of the body. The cord is protected by the bony spine (vertebrae) and by fluid (cerebrospinal fluid) that provides a cushion between the nerves within the cord and the hard surface of the spine. Spinal cord injuries do not generally just occur—they are usually caused by the negligence of another third party.
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Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (or “TBI”) is an acquired brain injury, which occurs when a sudden force causes damage to the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and violently hits an object, or when an object pierces the skull and enters brain tissue. Car, truck, and motorcycle accidents frequently result in TBIs. Symptoms of TBI can be mild, moderate, or severe, depending on the extent of the damage to the brain. A person with a mild TBI may remain conscious or may experience a loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes. Other symptoms of mild TBI include headache, confusion, lightheadedness, dizziness, blurred vision, ringing in the ears, bad taste in the mouth, fatigue or lethargy, change in sleep patterns, mood or behavior changes, and trouble with memory, concentration, or thinking. A person with a moderate or severe TBI may show these same symptoms, but may also have a headache that does not go away, repeated nausea or vomiting, seizures, excessive sleepiness, dilation of the pupils of the eyes, slurred speech, weakness or numbness in the arms or legs, loss of coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation.
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Brain Bleed/Aneurysm

A brain bleed, also called a “cerebral hemorrhage,” can lead to severe disability and death. One type of brain bleed is the result of an “aneurysm.” An aneurysm is a bulge in a blood vessel that develops because of a weakness in the wall of the vessel. As blood flows through the vessel, the weakened area bulges outward. As it does, the bulging wall becomes thinner and thinner. Eventually, it leaks blood. If nothing is done to stop it from bulging, the vessel may burst (or “rupture”). A ruptured aneurysm can quickly cause shock and death. Survivors of ruptured brain aneurysms typically have severe stroke symptoms, as portions of the brain served by the bleeding vessel die.
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Birth Trauma

Birth trauma (BT) refers to damage of the tissues and organs of a newly delivered child, often as a result of physical pressure or trauma during childbirth. The term also encompasses the long term consequences, often of a cognitive nature, of damage to the brain or cranium.
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Brain Injured Infants

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of disability and death in children and adolescents in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the two age groups at greatest risk for TBI are age 0-4 and 15-19.
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Skull Fracture

Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact or blow can cause the skull to break. It may be accompanied by concussion or other injury to the brain. The brain can be affected directly by damage to the nervous system tissue and bleeding. The brain can also be affected indirectly by blood clots that form under the skull and compress the underlying brain tissue (subdural or epidural hematoma).
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Paralysis

Paralysis can have a number of causes, including stroke, transient ischemic attack, head injury, spinal cord injury, nerve compression and tumors.
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Paraplegia


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Brain & Nerve Damage

Medical mistakes involving lack of oxygen, or anesthesia or surgical errors can result in brain and nerve damage. Brain and nerve damage usually limits a person's ability to function normally and may require years of medical treatment and physical therapy.
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Brain Infection/Meningitis

Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes (“meninges”) surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Most cases of meningitis are caused by a viral infection, but bacterial infections (and even fungal infections) can also lead to meningitis. Most of the time, viral meningitis will go away on its own over time. Bacterial meningitis, however, is a medical emergency and must be treated promptly with antibiotics. The Kennedy Law Team is here for you and your family when the medical professionals you entrust to treat and diagnose medical emergencies like meningitis have failed.
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Increased Intracranial Pressure

Increased intracranial pressure (“ICP”) is a rise in the pressure inside the skull that can result from or cause brain injury. ICP can be due to a rise in pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid. This is the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. An increase in intracranial pressure can also be due to a rise in pressure within the brain itself. This can be caused by a tumor, bleeding into the brain or fluid around the brain (hydrocephalus), or swelling within the brain itself from infection or other causes. These injuries can cause death if doctors fail to treat them properly in a timely manner.
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Stroke/”Brain Attack”

Stroke is a medical emergency and a leading cause of death in the United States. It occurs when a blood vessel in the brain bursts or, more commonly, when a blockage develops. Without treatment, brain cells quickly begin to die. The result can be serious disability or death. Medical professionals are trained and required to recognize the signs of stroke and act quickly.
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Surgical and Hospital Mistakes

Surgeons often tell patients, “don’t worry, this is a routine procedure.” But, to a patient, no surgery – indeed, no hospital visit – is routine. And for good reason: more than 100,000 people die each year in the hospital from preventable medical errors. (This number doesn’t even include injuries; only deaths) People suffer unnecessarily when doctors make mistakes and ignore their training.
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Anesthesia Mistakes

Anesthesia errors are a frequent source of medical negligence claims. This is because anesthesia mistakes often result in decreased oxygen supply to the patient, which in turn can result in respiratory and cardiac arrest. When a patient stops breathing (respiratory arrest) or their heart stops (cardiac arrest), it can be very difficult to resuscitate the patient. A delay in resuscitation can lead to brain damage; failure in resuscitation leads to death.
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Doctor/Nurse Miscommunication and Hand-Offs

One frequent cause of medical negligence is miscommunication. Some kind of miscommunication probably occurs every single day in most American hospitals. One particularly troublesome time for miscommunication is the patient “hand-off.” A hand-off is when responsibility for a patient is transferred from one nurse to another nurse or from one doctor to another doctor. Too often, the caregiver who is “signing out” is eager to leave the hospital and does not provide adequate and accurate information to the newly-arriving doctor or nurse. This often endangers patient safety and causes significant injury or death. In fact, it has been estimated that most serious medical errors involve a critical miscommunication at the time of a patient hand-off.
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Emergency Room Errors

The emergency department of a hospital is often the first place a patient encounters medical personnel. Nurses in the E.R. must appropriately triage patients as they arrive. In other words, they must quickly determine which patients need immediate care, and which patients can wait. Too often, however, triage decisions are wrong. Patients with acute, life-threatening problems are forced to wait for extended periods of time. When this happens, the result can be catastrophic. For example, failure to attend right away to a patient with an impending heart attack or stroke (“brain attack”) or a brain bleed or blood clot in the lungs can quickly lead to death or can result in permanent and severe disability. These are just a few of the conditions that must be dealt with immediately in an emergency department.
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Failure to Review Test Results

During the course of a hospital stay, patients may be subjected to dozens of radiology and laboratory tests: x-rays, CT scans, MRIs, blood work, urine tests, and others. The tests, however, are only useful if the physician who orders them promptly reviews the results. Unfortunately, sometimes the key to a difficult diagnosis is a radiology study or laboratory test that has been completed but has not been reviewed. The result may be buried on a desk, or in an e-mail inbox, or on a computer somewhere, but it isn’t reviewed. Failure to review completed studies – especially studies that show some kind of abnormality – is medical negligence. In some ways, such cases are particularly sad because they don’t involve a lapse in medical knowledge or technical expertise. Instead, they involve simple laziness or inattention of a kind that must not be tolerated from well-trained professionals in charge of safely caring for patients.
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Failure to Obtain Informed Consent

Prior to performing any surgery or procedure, the patient is supposed to be given “informed consent.” Informed consent is the process in which the treating doctor discloses appropriate information to the patient, so that the patient can make an educated decision about whether to undergo treatment. Informed consent generally includes a discussion of the nature of the proposed procedure, surgery, or treatment; reasonable alternatives to the proposed action; and the relevant risks, benefits, and uncertainties of each alternative.
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Lack of Consent/Medical Battery

Lack of consent is very different from lack of “informed consent.” Lack of consent is a form of “battery.” Battery is an unlawful physical contact or touching. Medical battery is when a healthcare provider does something to you intentionally and without your consent (or the consent of your representative if you cannot give consent). There are emergency situations where consent is implied. But outside of such emergencies, no one should touch you at a hospital without your consent.
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Medication Mistakes

Medication mistakes can happen anywhere along the chain of events leading to the administration of medication. There can be errors in selecting the drug (a prescription error), in ordering the drug, in dispensing the drug, in administering it, or in monitoring the drug once it’s taken. Mistakes can be due to inadequate knowledge of the prescriber. They can be due to an inaccurate computerized order entry. They can be due to the fact that certain drug names sound similar but are very different medications. Sometimes the right drug may be administered by the wrong route. For example, a drug supposed to be given by an injection in a muscle might instead be injected into a vein. Or the right drug could be given the right way in the right dose… but to the wrong patient.
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Never Events

The term “Never Event” was introduced in 2001 by Ken Kizer, former Chief Executive Officer of The National Quality Forum (“NSQ”). He used it to refer to shocking medical errors (for example, wrong-site surgery) that should never happen. Since then, a list of Never Events has been maintained by the Forum and updated periodically. A Never Event now refers to an adverse event that is serious and largely preventable, provided that adequate patient safety measures are taken. In other words, a never event is something bad that happens to a patient that should never happen. The occurrence of a Never Event is almost always the result of medical or hospital negligence. Accordingly, Never Events often result in the filing of medical negligence and wrongful death lawsuits.
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Post Operative Errors

Everyone is relieved when a surgeon comes to the family waiting room and says, “Everything went well. No complications.” But, even when surgery goes well, problems can arise. Sometimes it is unexpected post-operative bleeding or infection. Other times, bowel inactivity (an “ileus”) or even bowel obstruction may develop after surgery. Sutures used inside the body may come apart, resulting in sepsis (infection and inflammation caused by the body’s reaction to infection) or bacteremia (bloodstream infection). Too much pain medication may be given, which can mask post-operative complications.
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Surgical Mishaps

A surgical mishap or surgical “misadventure” refers to a mistake or series of mistakes made during surgery by a member of the surgical team. A surgical team consists of the surgeon and everyone else who assists the surgeon during the procedure: junior surgeons (residents and fellows), certified surgical technicians, scrub nurses, circulating nurses, and others. An example of a surgical mishap is when a surgeon injures one organ while attempting to remove or repair another organ. Or, perhaps, the surgeon cuts into tissue without properly identifying it first. This is a known cause of various nerve injuries in surgery. Excessive bleeding, nerve injuries, and injuries to organs are common surgical mishaps that may represent surgical negligence, depending on how exactly the injury occurred.
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Diagnosis and Treatment Errors

Diagnosis and treatment errors make up a high percentage of all medical negligence. Put simply, diagnosis is the process by which a doctor figures out what is causing a patient’s signs and symptoms. Once a patient has been correctly diagnosed, treatment can be directed to cure the condition or to reduce the patient’s symptoms. Treatment can range from simple monitering to very complicated and sophisticated surgical procedures.
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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm/Thoracic Aneurysm

An “aneurysm” is a bulge in a blood vessel that develops because of a weakness in the wall of the vessel. As blood flows through the vessel, the weakened area bulges outward. As it does, the bulging wall becomes thinner and thinner. Eventually, it leaks blood. If nothing is done to stop it from bulging, the vessel may burst (or “rupture”). A ruptured aneurysm can quickly cause shock and death.
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Cancer Misdiagnosis

Every physician understands the most important variable in successfully treating someone with cancer is early detection. Doctors are trained to recognize symptoms of cancer and to diagnose patients when they have it. Unfortunately, too many doctors ignore their training and put the lives of their patients at risk, allowing an early, treatable cancer to grow and metastasize into a larger, terminal cancer tumor over time.
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Delayed in Diagnosis of Cancer

Learning that you or a family member has been diagnosed with cancer can be overwhelming. But many types of cancer are curable, and many cancers that are not curable can be treated in a way that extends life for many, many years. Cancer is no longer the death sentence that it was several decades ago. Survival depends on the type of cancer and, typically, the “stage” of the cancer when it is diagnosed. Generally, the earlier cancer is detected, the better the prognosis.
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Heart Attack

There are many reasons why a doctor might miss the signs of an impending heart attack, and many of those reasons constitute medical negligence. At The Kennedy Law Team, we use all of our resources to get the answers and pursue recovery for patients that did not receive the medical treatment they deserve.
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Infections

Ideally, there would be no such thing as hospital-acquired infections. Unfortunately, hospital-acquired infections are very common. Hospitals simply do not do enough to control infections. Doctors and other Healthcare Providers understand how important it is to take precautions to prevent infections, but often fail to take even the basic step of washing their hands before touching any patient.
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Medication Errors

A great deal of emphasis and publicity has been devoted to the discussion of medication mistakes in hospitals. While medication errors are way too common in hospitals, such errors occur elsewhere, too. A family doctor may order the wrong drug or the wrong dose of the drug. Or, a pharmacist may dispense a drug other than the one ordered by the doctor. There are many “sound alike” medications with similar sounding names but very different purposes. (For example, “Adderall” and “Inderal” may sound the same when called in to a pharmacy by a doctor or nurse, but are very different.) There are “look alikes,” too, which lead to medication errors when prescriptions are handwritten. (For example, dopamine and dobutamine.) These sorts of errors have led to serious injury and death. And they are entirely preventable. If you or a loved one has been the victim of a medication error, we can assist you in determining whether a doctor, nurse, or pharmacist may be responsible.
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Pulmonary Embolism and DVT

A pulmonary embolism (or “P.E.”) is a blood clot in one of the blood vessels leading to the lungs. P.E. can be fatal. In less severe cases, an embolism can cause permanent tissue damage in the affected part of the lung and reduced blood oxygen levels. Pulmonary emboli (the plural of “embolism”) often originate in the deep veins of the legs. A clot in these vessels is called Deep Vein Thrombosis (or “DVT”). A blood clot in the legs can break off and travel through the veins into the main vessel leading to the lungs. If the clot is big enough, it can cause death within minutes.
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Misdiagnosed Aneurysm

A diagnosis of aneurysm may missed because its symptoms may be mistaken for symptoms of such conditions like a migraine headache. For people with a prior diagnosis of migraine headache, it can be easy to assume that a severe headache is simply a migraine. This can result in a delay in seeking medical care and a diagnosis of a brain aneurysm.
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Wrongful Death

A person who negligently causes the death of another can be held accountable. Medical mistakes and vehicle accidents are among the many causes of negligent, wrongful deaths.
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Inappropriate or Negligently Performed Surgery

Having surgery can be an overwhelming experience before, during, and after the procedure. Many surgeons perform procedures that help save the lives of their patients and enhance quality of life. Unfortunately, due to a wide range of mistakes, a patient can also suffer serious injury, illness, or even death at the hands of a negligent surgeon.
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Amputation

Amputation of a limb that results from infection, improper diagnosis, late diagnosis, other negligence, or amputation of the wrong limb can leave a patient struggling to make ends meet and to perform basic daily tasks. Responsible medical professionals can be held accountable when their errors result in avoidable amputation.
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Misdiagnosis of Disease or Injury

It is essential to diagnose cancer, heart disease, impending heart attack/stroke and other ailments quickly before they progress. One key is for medical professionals to order proper tests and to correctly read and interpret lab results, and radiology scans, like CTs and MRIs. Misdiagnosing a condition can lead to delayed or improper treatment, which can result in complications or even death. Doctors who misdiagnose lung, liver, colon, breast or brain cancer, impending heart attack/stroke or other conditions may be negligent.
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Disability

Disability is the consequence of an impairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional, developmental, or some combination of these limitations. A disability may be present from birth, or occur during a person's lifetime.
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Disfigurement

Disfigurement is the state of having one's appearance deeply and persistently harmed medically, such as from a disease, birth defect, traumatic events, or wound.
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Emergency Room Malpractice

The chaotic nature of emergency rooms can lead to numerous emergency room errors. When physicians, nurses, surgeons and/or general hospital employees are neglectful in their responsibilities to patients and injuries are sustained, emergency room medical malpractice lawsuits may be filed.
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Delayed Treatment

The average patient must wait more than 4 hours before they're able to see a doctor in an emergency room in the U.S., according to ABC News reports. Those long delays can worsen patients' injuries, and under certain circumstances that can lead to medical malpractice lawsuits.
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Anesthetic Mishaps

Anesthesia and surgery can be risky for all, the healthy as well as the sick. While the prevention of adverse outcomes in healthy patients is paramount, enhancement of safety for critically ill patients is also essential, since they are more likely to suffer serious injury from the anesthesia mishaps due to their underlying critically ill condition.
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Other Cases We Handle

Auto Accident
Class Actions
Insurance Bad Faith
Pharmaceutical Liability
Products Liability
Toxicity
Personal Injury
Premises Liability/Slip and Fall
Others

Auto Accident

A traffic collision, also known as a traffic accident, motor vehicle collision, motor vehicle accident, car accident, automobile accident, road traffic collision, road traffic accident, wreck, car crash, or car smash occurs when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, pedestrian, animal, road debris, or other stationary obstruction, such as a tree or utility pole. Traffic collisions may result in injury, death, vehicle damage, and property damage.
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Class Actions

A class action, class suit, or representative action is where a group (a class) sues another party, for a civil wrongdoing that caused injury to those members of the class.
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Insurance Bad Faith

Insurance bad faith is a legal term unique to the law of the United States that describes a tort claim that an insured person may have against an insurance company for its bad acts in failing to abide by the insurance policy terms or refusing to pay a valid claim.
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Pharmaceutical Liability

Drugs and medicines are frequently at the center of products liability suits. Manufacturers of these products have a duty to appropriately test the drugs and medicines before releasing them into the market, using testing criteria from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These criteria are regarded as industry standards, but the fact that a drug was properly licensed by the FDA has no effect on the manufacturer's liability to an injured plaintiff, if the drug proves to be otherwise defective in its design or manufacture.
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Products Liability

Products liability is the area of law in which designers, manufacturers, distributors, suppliers, retailers, and others who make products available to the public are held responsible for the injuries those products cause. Although the word "product" has broad connotations, products liability as an area of law is traditionally limited to products in the form of tangible personal property.
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Toxicity

Toxicity is the degree to which a substance can damage the human body. Toxicity can refer to the effect on the human body, and injury to the body, that can result from excessive amounts of a substance released into the body due to negligent medication prescribing or poor monitoring of a medication's impact on the body.
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Personal Injury

Personal injury is a legal term for an injury to the body, mind or emotions. It refers to a type of tort lawsuit alleging that the plaintiff's injury has been caused by the negligence of another. Damages include bodily injury, intentional infliction of emotional distress (IIED), and negligent infliction of emotional distress (NIED).
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Premises Liability/Slip and Fall

When someone enters your property, they have a reasonable expectation of not getting injured. This means that you, as a property owner (or non-owner resident), are responsible for maintaining a relatively safe environment. This is known as "premises liability." For example, a courier delivering a package may sue you for injuries if he slips and falls on an oil slick in the driveway.
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Others

If you have a question about a claim not listed here, please contact us here at the Kennedy Law Team at (410) 504-1899 for more information.
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